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The Daily Stream

Newest Article

November 24: Using Water For Peace In The Middle East

The  Global Rundown

The Global Rundown

Water sharing could be a platform for peace along the Jordan River. Climate change is raising concerns about water and food security in Jamaica, and sea levels will continue to rise for millennia. Much of Africa‘s hydropower is untapped despite investment, Egypt is seeking billions for water and energy infrastructure projects, and an Iowa city is suing the state over water treatment costs. Many Americans are living next to toxic Superfund sites, while communities in Malawi are concerned about water contamination from a uranium mine.

“Anywhere in the world – and certainly in the Middle East – no one survives without water,”—Gidon Bromberg, director of EcoPeace Middle East, on efforts to use water to spark cooperation between countries along the Jordan River. (New Security Beat)

By the Numbers

By The Numbers

49 million Americans who live close to a toxic Superfund site, many of which involve contaminated water. National Geographic

40 percent Possible decline in rainfall in Jamaica due to climate change, leading to worries about food security. Inter Press Service

93 percent Economically viable hydropower potential that is unexploited in Africa, where growing economies are demanding more energy. Guardian

$10-12 billion Investment in 20 energy, water and transportation projects Egypt hopes to gain at an international conference in March. Reuters

$7,000/day Estimated cost of a water treatment process to remove nitrates from public supplies in Des Moines, Iowa, where a water utility is considering suing the state over high nitrate pollution levels. WHOTV

Science

Science, Studies, And Reports

Sea levels will continue to rise 2.3 meters in the next 2,000 years even if the world acts quickly to cut greenhouse gas emissions, according to a report from the World Bank. Other climate change effects, such as water insecurity, are already being felt. Reuters

On the Radar

On The Radar

Communities in Malawi are worried about a plan by Paladin Energy to start releasing treated tailings water from one of its uranium mines into a river used as a public water source. The company says the water is safe and meets local and international standards. Bloomberg

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Water News

Newest Article

Orange County Recycled Water System Shows Importance of Collaboration

From Southern California, a model of success for water’s future.

Peru and Chile Gold Mine Projects Address Water Concerns

The mining companies behind the Conga and Pascua-Lama mines are working to gain support from communities who have been worried about water pollution and adequate supplies.

Recycled Water Facility in Australia Offers Lessons for Global Drought Planning

Recycling wastewater is cheaper than desalination and less environmentally damaging than river diversions.

Infographic: Drought Draws Down Sao Paulo’s Water Supplies to Critical Levels

The Cantareira water system that supplies half of Sao Paulo’s 20 million residents is now 10 percent full after more than year of record-setting drought.

Infographic: Brazil’s Water Resources Far Away From Major Cities

Sao Paulo, the largest city in Brazil and the ninth largest in the world, is mired in a severe drought and faces the prospect of water rationing.

U.S. Farm Irrigation Becomes More Efficient, Moves East

Federal data show that U.S. farms use less water and are investing in water-saving irrigation equipment.

U.S.-China Climate Deal Includes Provision on Water-Energy Research

A joint energy research program will be extended and expanded to include water.

Delays in Drought Response Push East Africa Toward Another Food Crisis

Despite early-warning systems, the world lacks urgency in heading off slow-moving disasters.

Report: International Panel on Climate Change Reiterates Three Urgent Water Concerns

IPCC says the water cycle will intensify, leading to bigger storms, more droughts, and worsening water quality.

Surrounded By Water, Ohio River Valley Experiences Economic Resurgence

Six-state region at head of American recovery.

Sao Paulo’s Water Waiting Game Avoided Rationing But Produced Huge Risk of Severe Shortage

Desire to protect the poor left Brazil’s driest city few options other than new pipes and prayers for rain.

Californians Will Vote on Big Water Bond Not Knowing Exactly What They Are Buying

Rules for choosing the most controversial projects will be written later.

San Antonio Pipeline Continues Texas Water Rush

America’s seventh-largest city debates a pipeline project worth billions as the second-fastest-growing state faces more demands for water in its third year of severe drought.

Hawaii River Restorations Reflect National Desire to Protect Water for Public Benefit

Using public trust doctrine, communities restore streams diverted for more than 100 years.

Report: U.S. Water Systems, Deteriorated and Slow to Change, Need New Strategy – And Money

More of the same is not working in changed conditions of the 21st century.

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In The Circle: Fresh Focus

Newest Article

India’s National Green Tribunal Challenges Government and Industry To Follow the Law

Four-year-old court emerges as global leader in securing resources, promoting economic gain.

Water Supply and New Development Path Are Priorities in U.S.-China Climate Agreement

Pact is fresh reckoning with Earth's changed ecological and economic risks

The Hydrologic Fast Lane (Also: IPCC Reports 101)

Reporter Kaye LaFond breaks down the newest IPCC report, and IPCC reports in general.

Risk Assessment Tool Puts a Price on Water Scarcity

The Water Risk Monetizer guides corporate investments where water is scarce.

Election 2014 Recap: Voters Mostly Say ‘Yes’ to Water Spending

easures passed in California, Florida, and Maine, while North Dakota voted against conservation fund.

Earth Pushes Back

Era of indifference greets droughts, floods, storms, tsunamis.

U.S. Government Builds a Home for Water Data

The Open Water Data Initiative wants a common house for real-time U.S. water information. But this could take decades.

Earth’s Major Aquifers Are in Trouble

Groundwater reserves are falling, but little is known about how much water is left.

Big Data Requires Strong Relationships to Improve Farming

To influence water and food systems, the data revolution needs more than billions of bits. Brett Walton analyzes the lessons from last week’s Water for Food Global Conference.

Social Media Is Not Easy

After being named the Guardian’s #1 Twitter pick for #waternews, outreach coordinator Aubrey Ann Parker explains our winning strategy.

Business, Finance Leaders Address U.S. Water Policy

From markets and higher prices, better water systems will flow, they say.

Showing Off Circle of Blue Colleagues and Reporting in Traverse City

World-changing reporting fresh from northern Michigan.

Matt Black’s California Drought Photographs Featured in New Yorker

Circle of Blue photographer documents Central Valley water shortage.

Great Lakes Mayors Ask State and Federal Governments to Step Up On Algae

Drinking water summit focuses on Toledo water crisis.

Celebrating with a Blue Streak

A new member of the Circle of Blue team introduces herself.

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Action Figures

Newest Article

Azzam Alwash

Can war end in environmental rejuvenation? It did for Iraq’s Mesopotamian Marshlands, believed by many to be the Biblical Garden of Eden. The marshes — straddled between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers that wind their way from Turkey’s eastern mountains through the desert plains of the Middle East — were systematically destroyed by Saddam Hussein’s […]

Dennis Nelson

Dennis Nelson grew up on his family’s North Dakota farm, where the groundwater well barely supplied their basic needs. As a child, he didn’t know why the water was scarce when their land was surrounded by wetlands, or “prairie potholes,” as he calls them. “I simply couldn’t make the connection at a young age about […]

Stacey Travis

For more than 15 years, Stacey Travis was a television producer for networks like FOX, A&E, and AMC. Until, that is, she drastically switched careers in 2006, when doctors in Uganda and South Sudan told her about the water-related illnesses that plague these nations. Travis felt compelled to help and soon after founded Drop In […]

Ajay Krishnan

Can something be made of nothing? According to the research of 16-year-old Ajay Krishnan, the answer is yes. A research enthusiast since the sixth grade, Krishnan — now a junior at Oregon Episcopal School — found a way to produce hydrogen gas from wastewater utilizing microbial electrolysis cells. For his work in renewable energy, Krishnan […]

Rose George

While working as an editor and writer at COLORS Magazine, Rose George was assigned to work on Cacas, a coffee table book featuring photographs of animal and human feces, for which “caca” is slang. Through the project, she discovered Sulabh International, an organization in India that provides public toilets and works to liberate those whose […]

Peter Thum

Wine turned Peter Thum to water. While working on a project in South Africa involving two wineries, Thum saw the difficulties that many people experienced just trying to get clean water every day. “I did a bit of research and began to see the size and magnitude of this problem,” he says. So he decided […]

Vessela Monta

“We cannot say that rain is not interesting just because we can dig wells,” says Vessela Monta, a civil engineer by trade who began working with the International Rainwater Harvesting Alliance (IRHA) in 2002. Some resources — like the availability of harvestable rainwater — get forgotten when discussing sustainability, but not to Monta. She points […]

Isabella Bovolo

Guyana means “land of many waters” in a native Amerindian language, but it also houses one of the most pristine rainforests left in existence, the Iwokrama. In 1996, Guyana and the Commonwealth of Nations established an organization of the same name. According to Iwokrama resident scientist Isabella Bovolo, the organization aims to fill large data […]

David Breashears

In 2007, from 5,600 meters atop the north side of Mount Everest, explorer David Breashears recalls how he was “astonished” by what he saw and “shocked” that he hadn’t been more aware of the state of this Tibetan glacier. Breashears was on a comparative photography assignment to match a photo from 1921 with the modern […]

Erin Huber

Erin Huber grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, near the Great Lakes, where clean fresh water is abundant and tap water is sometimes taken for granted. As a humanitarian and an environmentalist, Huber spearheaded rooftop gardens and farmers’ markets, but eventually honed her focus to water. Huber founded the Drink Local Drink Tap (DLDT) campaign in […]

Rohini Nilekani

Rohini Nilekani began her career as a journalist and writer. But upon marrying Nadan Nilekani — co-founder of the Indian tech-consulting firm Infosys — and coming into some money, she sought a cause to support financially. “I was looking for an area that would make sense to me and that would also have some kind […]

Chris Groves

Dr. Chris Groves spends a lot of his time going underground into caves carved by eons of water flow. Once a boy with an interest in rocks, today Groves is a world-renowned cave and limestone karst expert who directs the Hoffman Environmental Research Institute at Western Kentucky University. “It was the only practical way to […]

Lori Pottinger

Lori Pottinger advocates for rural communities that are at risk of being displaced by dam construction. She says that residents are not always aware of the extent of cultural and lifestyle adjustments they will have to make — or the option of resisting development. “They’re giving their all, and then they’re getting nothing from these […]

Kunal Sangani

Innovation started early for incoming Stanford University freshman Kunal Sangani. At just 17, he was named the U.S. finalist for the Stockholm Junior Water Prize for his project about the environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing (also known as “fracking”). A native of Syracuse, New York, where intense discussion about fracking led to a moratorium on […]

Ed Wargin

Ed Wargin set out almost 17 years ago to document the Great Lakes, and he’s almost finished. The Fresh Coast Project is an effort to document the Great Lakes as a single unit. “I have felt through the years that we needed a solitary type of message, that we needed to look at the Great […]

Ned Breslin

Ned Breslin is the CEO at Water For People, a nonprofit that implements drinking water solutions in 11 countries.
  •    More Ned Breslin

  • Peter Gleick

    Dr. Peter Gleick is president of the Pacific Institute, an internationally recognized water expert, and a MacArthur Fellow.
  •    More Peter Gleick

  • James Workman

    James Workman is an award-winning journalist and has served as an environmental consultant to U.S.-cabinet members.
  •    More James Workman

  • Infographic: Live and Historical Water Reservoir Volumes in California (1990-Present)

    Qlikview Qlikview

    U.S. Drought Monitor & Seasonal Outlook

    US Drought Monitor US Drought Outlook
    The U.S. Drought Monitor and Seasonal Outlook report the most current drought conditions and forecast, courtesy of NOAA, et al.

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