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Infographic: Going the Distance, From Ashgabat to Whyalla—10 Cities Pumping Water From Afar

In many cities, water travels far to reach the tap.

Residents of the planet’s driest places rely on extensive waterways to deliver their supply. Click through the interactive infographic below to learn more about 10 cities that rely on extensive waterways, plus additional plans to expand networks even further.

Graphic © Kelly Shea/Ball State University for Circle of Blue
10 Cities Pumping Water From Afar. Click the interactive graphic to learn more. Click here if you are having troubling viewing the Going the Distance Infographic.

Graphic by Kelly Shea, an undergraduate student at Ball State University.

With contribution by Aubrey Ann Parker and Brett Walton. Parker is a Traverse City-based data analyst and news desk editor for Circle of Blue and can be reached at aubrey@circleofblue.org. Walton is a Seattle-based reporter for Circle of Blue and can be reached at brett@circleofblue.org

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7 Comments
  1. […] of Blue has a great interactive infographic showing ten major cities that pump their water from afar. Including San Diego, CA, Los Angeles, CA, […]

  2. […] of Blue has a great interactive infographic showing ten major cities that pump their water from afar. Including San Diego, CA, Los Angeles, CA, […]

  3. […] In many cities, water travels far to reach the tap. Residents of the planet’s driest places rely o… […]

  4. The Murray River does not flow southeast, it flows northwest, then it flows south to the sea.

  5. Just thought you might want to know the picture under “source” California Acqueduct to San Diego is a beautiful picture of the cascades into the San Fernando Valley (L.A. Aqueduct)! This is not part of the California State Water Project. In fact, the picture is just another view of the picture under “source” of water for L.A. from the Owens Valley.

  6. […] aquifers in the USGS study also benefited from canal systems that brought surface water from afar. Two aquifers in the Pacific Northwest actually saw net increases in groundwater storage over the […]

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